Firelight of a Different Colour: The Life and Times of Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing

Firelight of a Different Colour: The Life and Times of Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing

Synopsis When Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing threw himself to his death from the terrace of Hong Kong’s Mandarin Oriental Hotel in 2003, he was the greatest star of his generation in the city. A performer loved for his character as much as for his magic as an entertainer, his death sent shock waves across Asia and amongst Asian populations around the world. Despite the fact that he was openly gay, he was adored, and remains adored, by multitudes in societies where his sexual orientation remains a little-discussed taboo. Firelight of a Different Colour traces Leslie’s story from birth in 1950s Hong Kong to his death during the city’s crippling SARS epidemic. Through initial struggles to gain a foothold in TV and the nascent world of Cantopop, he achieved final success as a megastar of music and the big screen and held that position for nearly two decades. At the forefront of almost all the cultural changes Hong Kong saw during his lifetime, Leslie came to embody the unique spirit of the city. No Western performer can boast so widespread an influence across so many arts. Firelight of a Different Colour commemorates a life that continues to amaze and inspire. Metadata Imprint: Signal 8 Press Publication date: Feb. 25, 2014 Print edition: 5.5″ x 8.5″ perfect bound trade paperback Page count: 460 ISBN: 978-988-15542-6-0 Price (paper): US$19.95/HK$160 E-book formats: ePub, Kindle, PDF Word count: 111,000 eISBN: 978-988-15542-0-8 Price (e-book): US$9.99 Blurbage Exhaustively researched and beautifully written, Nigel Collett’s book is a perfectly fitting tribute to an incredible talent who was lost too soon. Essential reading for any serious student of Asian cinema or queer cinema. — Matthew Hays, author, journalist and film studies professor, Concordia University Fridae Leslie Cheung 4 Vietnam Susan Blumberg-Kason TimeOutHK Amos Lassen Malcolm’s Round Table Huffington Post South China Morning Post Asian Review of Books LGBTQNation Asian Cha Asian Review, Volume 1 – Number 1, July 2014. – Selections from April-June 2014 Author bio Nigel Collett studied history at St Peter’s College, Oxford and biography at the University of Buckingham. After serving for twenty years in the British Army, a career that culminated in the command of 6th Queen Elizabeth’s Own Gurkha Rifles, he founded the Gurkha International Group, which finds employment for Nepalese men and women, principally as crew for cruise lines. His publications include A Grammar, Phrase Book and Vocabulary of Baluchi (1984) and An English-Nepali-English Dictionary (1994). He is the author of The Butcher of Amritsar, a life of Brigadier Dyer, the perpetrator of the Amritsar massacre, published in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society. Buy E-books: Amazon Smashwords Paperback: Amazon Flyers                ...

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A Muslim on the Bridge: On being an Iraqi-Arab Muslim in the Twenty-First Century

A Muslim on the Bridge: On being an Iraqi-Arab Muslim in the Twenty-First Century

              Synopsis A memoir and meditation on faith, A Muslim on the Bridge: On Being an Iraqi-Arab Muslim in the Twenty-first Century tells a story of transformation and reflection as the author thoughtfully but pointedly deconstructs the widespread misconceptions about Islam, arguably the world’s most-misunderstood major religion. The son of a Shia father and a Sunni mother, Ali was born in Baghdad in 1969. At this time in Iraq’s history, the country had a Muslim heritage but was a secular, diverse society. Neither of Ali’s parents prayed, fasted, or visited the mosque. He and his friends grew up listening to Western pop music and watching Western films. They studied at a school established by American Jesuit priests in the early twentieth century… and Saddam Hussein’s sons Uday and Qusay were among the students in that school at the time of Ali’s enrollment. The years that followed saw drastic changes in Iraq as Saddam strong-armed the country into a strict, fundamentalist application of Islam, an interpretation Ali rejects. A Muslim on the Bridge is an essential read for our times, a book that takes a close, informed, and rational look at problematic issues in Islam like polygamy, violence, divorce, homosexuality, veiled women, interfaith marriages, apostasy, and the perception of other cultures and religions. Metadata Publication date: Nov. 19, 2013 Print edition: 5″ x 8″ perfect bound trade paperback Page count: 296 ISBN: 978-988-15542-9-1 Price (paper): US$16.95 E-book formats: ePub, Kindle, PDF Word count: 70,000 eISBN: 978-988-15542-2-2 Price (e-book): US$7.99 Blurbage With almost a quarter of the world’s population embracing Islam, Ali Shakir’s work provides a timely insight into the dilemmas facing contemporary Muslims caught between the desire for modernity and respect for tradition. Having set out to determine whether other religions might be “better, worse, or just like Islam”, his journey is also an articulate exploration of the rivalry between monotheistic faiths that has always existed and, along with politics, kept the flames of hatred in the Middle East burning for so long. He particularly examines the Koran whose teachings are wide open to interpretation, being written in a language that is different from the ordinary Arabic of today, and focuses on the “most quoted verse on Muslim bigotry word wide” which states that they should avoid dealings and friendships with non-believers in every possible way. The Prophet Mohammed acknowledged both Judaism and Christianity on several occasions, he says; the commandment said nothing about friendships, being merely an instruction not to take non-believers as protectors or leaders. It is hard to disagree with his conclusion that between Muslims, Jews and Christians it is extremely difficult to determine who are the promised descendants of Abraham....

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Smokescreen

Smokescreen

Synopsis: At an ancient café in Cairo, two veteran spies plot a covert mission to resolve — once and for all — the Israeli – Palestinian conflict. The pledge: Israel will make a major concession as part of the peace treaty. In Singapore, Jethro Westrope, a magazine journalist, stumbles onto the scene of a murder: the beautiful Niki Kishwani directs him, in her last breath, to a digital recorder, evidence that puts Jethro’s life in serious danger. And, much worse, he is framed for Niki’s murder. Jethro sets out to find Niki’s killer and is drawn into a web of deception and intrigue involving officials from the Singaporean, Israeli, and American governments, each with a complex, competing, and potentially deadly agenda. Against this pulse-pounding backdrop, Jethro races to find answers and save himself —yet nothing is as it seems. He finds himself at the centre of a political plot so diabolical and sweeping in its world implications that he is stunned to discover tomorrow’s news headlines today. He is being set up not only as a murderer but as an assassin, and something much larger than his own fate is in his hands. Metadata: Publication date: Jan 21, 2014 E-book formats: ePub, Kindle, PDF Word count: 66,000 eISBN: 978-988-12195-3-4 Price (e-book): US$6.99 Print edition: 5 x 8 Page count: 332 ISBN: 978-988-12195-8-9 Price (paper): $16.95 Blurbs: Devious! Diabolical! Lurid! Intelligent and deftly plotted. Pick it up if you dare. Put it down if you can. —Ruth Harris, million-copy NYT bestselling co-author of Hooked and Brainwashed Khaled Talib’s novel Smokescreen is a cocktail of Deighton, Ludlum, Hitchcock, and two parts adrenaline. — Keith Thomson, author of the New York Times Bestselling novel Once A Spy   In this action-packed thriller, Khaled Talib explores the little-known relationship between Singapore and Israel, spinning a web of international intrigue that expands across the globe as inexorably as it tightens around his protagonist’s throat. — Jon McGoran, author of Drift I have published two novels set in the police and security services in Singapore, and I am here to tell you that Smokescreen is nearer to the truth of that closely controlled little country than you might believe. It is a gripping and creepy tale of how governments can rig the way we all see the world. — Jake Needham, author of The Umbrella Man and The Ambassador’s Wife Times of Israel Quiet Fury Books Crime Fiction Lover Janice Gable Bashman Digital Journal Arab Daily News TR Emeritus Thriller Ink Egypt Today Simply Fabulicious Write to Sell your Book OmniMystery News The Book Haven Musings and Marvels Digital Pubbing Book to the Future Crime Thriller Hound Millennium Post Thriller Journal Examiner SilverKris Fiction Frenzy...

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Drought

Drought

Synopsis Drought, a translation of Iwan Simatupang’s novel, Kering (1972), is a joyous celebration of life and human commitment. Its hero is an ex-student, ex-soldier, and ex-bandit, who decides to transmigrate to one of the outer islands of Indonesia to restart life as a farmer. His near failure brings him into contact with a wonderful range of inspired madmen—bureaucrats, bandits, psychiatrists, religious teachers, and the beautiful woman known simply as the V.I.P. Combined, these characters bring into question the normalcy of conventional society. Drought shows Simatupang writing at the height of his powers and is a lyrical testimony to the strength—and the unpredictability—of the human character. Metadata Imprint: BookCyclone Publication date: 12 March, 2013 ISBN: 9789881554123 E-book formats: ePub, Kindle, PDF Word count: 111,000 Price (e-book): US$11.99 Buy Ebook: Amazon Smashwords    ...

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