Funereal

Funereal

Synopsis: Soobin Shin is an aspiring young woman in a near-future version of Seoul. Ever since her college graduation, she has struggled to escape from her dead-end job in a doughnut chain. Her twin sister Hyewon is one of Korea’s most recognizable models, but Soobin just can’t seem to find her lucky break… until one evening, a creepy regular customer offers her a job in a company he has just started. OneLife Korea is going to save South Korea one funeral at a time… by burying the living in order to help them find some peace of mind in the country with the highest suicide rate in the developed world. Soobin has already lost her mother, and her relationship with her boyfriend is on the rocks. What else does she have to lose? Everything at OneLife Korea seems perfect until high-profile clients actually start dying. Soobin Shin is Korea’s beautiful new angel of death, and Funereal is a snapshot of a city in flux, taking a look at the dark side to surgery, survival, and stardom in the near future of one of Asia’s most dynamic capitals. Metadata: Publication date: April 14, 2015 Print edition: 5″ x 8″ perfect bound trade paperback Page count: TBD ISBN: 978-988-12198-1-7 Price (paper): US$17.95 E-book formats: ePub, Kindle, PDF Word count: 48,000 eISBN: 978-988-12198-5-5 Price (e-book): US$7.99 Buy E-books: Amazon Smashwords Paperback:  Amazon Book Depository Blurbage: Funereal takes us on a bracing journey through the physical and psychological landscape of modern Seoul, entertaining us while never shying away from the big questions. The prose is taut and electric, buzzing like the hi-tech world that its characters inhabit. Funereal is both a thriller and a meditation on life in the 21st century, illuminating a world where media, technology, and the thirst for fame can turn the idea of living and dying on its head. Funereal is an impressive and imaginative achievement from an exciting new writer. – Chris Tharp, The Worst Motorcycle in Laos: Rough Travels in Asia, Dispatches from the Peninsula. Wai Yu Lin at Sumgyeonjingem Soren Kaneda at Black Lines Zander at Critical Kpop Yvo at It’s All About Books Lore at United Kpop Mark James Russell Colin Marshall @Boing Boing Hyper Ashley Slightly Bookist Groove Korea Chicago Center for Literature and Photography Giacomo Lee Interview on Radio Kimchi UK, Kingston Green FM 11/05/2016 Author bio: Giacomo Lee hails from London, but has also lived in Italy and South Korea. His writing has been featured on Boing Boing, io9 and Shortlist, whilst short fiction of his can be found in Aspidistra, L’Allure Desmots and the New Asian Writing anthologies. Follow him on Twitter at @elegiacomo, and read more at http://giacomolee.com/....

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Dispatches from the Peninsula: Six Years in South Korea

Dispatches from the Peninsula: Six Years in South Korea

      By Chris Tharp Meta: Publication date: September 27, 2011 ISBN (print): 978-988-15161-1-4 eISBN: 978-988-15161-5-2 Paper edition specs: Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 perfect bound trade paperback Page count: coming soon E-book specs: Formats: ePub, mobi (Kindle), PDF Word count: 90,000 Synopsis: Thousands of young adults pass through South Korea each year, teaching English in private schools that together make up one of the country’s largest industries. Korea, long isolated by culture and geography, with a complex language and set of social mores, can be a difficult place to call home. Chris Tharp has begun to make a name for himself as a travel writer, and in this gruff but affectionate memoir, explains why Korea can be both hard to like and hard to leave. He navigates his way through the timeless alleys and neon streets of Korea’s cities, painting a picture of a society that is at once ancient and utterly modern; he serves in the trenches of the English teaching industry, working his way from the private, for-profit academy to the university; he treks through the peninsula’s mountain valleys and rides deep into the country’s rural soul on the back of his motorcycle; he also explores the internal geography of Korea, from nearly being deported over a comedy performance, getting caught in the middle of a street riot, to staring face to face with North Korean soldiers along the DMZ. During this six-year journey Tharp must also deal with the death of his parents, which forces him to ask the question: Is home a place that we’re from, or is it something we take with us wherever we go? Praise: Tharp is like some punk-rock Huck Finn, as aware and humane as he is blithely non- PC, drama springing up around him with every choice he makes: another country, another drink, another thought he maybe should have kept to himself—but his brain is bigger than his mouth, and Dispatches from the Peninsula gives us the whole show. And somehow, amid all its intelligence and humor, the book packs a deeper wallop too, as a serious meditation on the lifelong experiment of growing up. – Lawrence Krauser, author of Lemon, The Joy of Google, and The Day in Question   Tough and true is Tharp’s journey in South Korea. I found myself back here, welcoming anew Korea’s wonder, her wrangle, the distinct spirit of the peninsula and her people. All along the way, Tharp is an observant and steady companion.   – Cullen Thomas, author of Brother One Cell Buy: Paperback: Amazon Book Depository Paddyfield What the Book Powell’s E-book: Amazon (US) Barnes & Noble Omnilit.com Apple Smashwords Kobo (Or just google it. Our e-books are sold...

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